[Comp-neuro] AAAI Fall Symposium: EMERGENT AGENTS AND SOCIALITIES: SOCIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL ASPECTS OF INTELLIGENCE

Goran Trajkovski gtrajkovski at towson.edu
Sun Apr 1 19:57:39 CEST 2007


2007 FALL AAAI SYMPOSIUM

EMERGENT AGENTS AND SOCIALITIES:
SOCIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL ASPECTS OF INTELLIGENCE
 
Washington, DC * November 8­11, 2007
 
 
http://pages.towson.edu/gtrajkov/FSS07
http://www.aaai.org/Symposia/Fall/fss07.php
 
The study of agency and multiagent systems crosses disciplinary boundaries
by focusing on society, culture and communication as emerging from
interactions of autonomous agents. Poised at the intersections of AI,
cybernetics, sociology, semiotics and anthropology, this strand of
multiagent systems research enables a powerful perspective illuminating not
only how we live and learn, but also, through focusing on emergence, how we
anticipate the future.
 
This symposium focuses on second order emergence. The constituents in a
system are aware of an emergent phenomenon and adapt accordingly. New agents
emerge as human and nonhuman agents interact, hinting at new qualities that
may enable us to push the use of technology to its maximum capacity, and in
the process imbricating both the observer and the observed in successive
cycles of emergence.
 
In most studies to date, the non-human agent is subordinate to the human
agents. Without the human input (and in the absence of another obstacle),
the non-human agent goes nowhere. On the other hand, if we look at these
interactions as emergent socialities, the non-human agent has a pivotal
role­that of amanuensis for all subsequent social interaction. That is,
without the non-human agent, there can be no emergent social interaction to
begin with. 
 
Theories of emergence suggest a dynamic, multi-directionality of perception
organized socially as multi-agent systems. What is less studied is the
messiness of those multi-agent systems themselves, the way they involve
complex ³translations³ between human and non-human agents, or ³transcodings²
between different representational and discursive modalities.
 
The symposium proposes to delve into the messiness of the social,
approaching it from multiple perspectives simultaneously‹computational,
sociological, linguistic and cybernetic‹in such a way as to stimulate our
own sites of emergence at the borders of these disciplines.
 
 
Focal areas:
1)  Concepts, definitions and theories
2)  Cognitive aspects of emergence in interactions
3)  Tools and methods for studying emergent phenomena
4)  Simulations and experiments in agency, interaction, and emergence
5)  Emergent of society, and societal phenomena
6)  Organization and societies, interaction and communication
 
 
 
ORGANIZING COMMITTEE
 
Goran Trajkovski (co-chair), Towson University, USA
Samuel Collins (co-chair), Towson University, USA
 
Laszlo Gulyas, AITIA International Inc., Hungary
Michael North, Argonne National Laboratories, USA
Keith Sawyer, Washington University in St Louis, MO, USA
Richard Schilling, Cognition Group Inc, USA
Georgi Stojanov, American University in Paris, France
 
 
Please submit all questions to Goran Trajkovski, gtrajkovski at towson.edu
(http://pages.towson.edu/gtrajkov)
 
Submission details
Those interested in participating in this symposium should send either a
full paper (8 pages maximum) or a position paper (1-2 pages) in AAAI format
in PDF to interaction.emergence at gmail.com.
 
The abstracts are due by May 1, 2007. Acceptance/rejection notices will be
mailed on or about May 21, 2007. Full versions of papers will be expected by
July 1st, 2007, and, if accepted, the camera-ready version of the paper will
be due by September 1, 2007.
 
Limited financial support is available for students-participants of this
symposium.
 

-- 
Cordially yours,
Goran Trajkovski
http://pages.towson.edu/gtrajkov

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